Plantain is an ancient plant original to Europe but now widely distributed throughout most of the world. Although the herb has a very long history of use, many people consider it a nuisance plant when it shows up in their carefully manicured lawns. In fact, plantain is so prolific and persistent in spread that it’s referred to as a cosmopolitan weed, meaning it’s often found growing in roadside gravel or jutting out between rocks. While fresh plantain leaf is consumed as a bitter salad herb, the dried leaf is used to produce teas, tonics and infusions. Due to the presence of an astringent compound called aucubin, plantain is also used to make poultices as well as infused oils and tinctures for topical use.

Plantain Leaf c/s, 1/4 lb

$8.99Price
  • Also known as Cuckoo's Bread, Ripple Grass, Waybread, common plantain has a long history of use in North America, earning a place in Native American history as well as in English herbal literature dating to the early 1600s.

    Today, Slan-lus, an old name for plantain that means “plant of healing,” is used in tea blends. Because the plant contains a compound called aucubin, one of several iridoid glycosides that plants use as defense from pathogens, plantain leaf is also used to make infused oils and tinctures for topical use.